FORGOTTEN DETAIL’ IN AUSTRALIA POST LUXURY REPLICA WATCH SCANDAL

If you’re out of the loop, the CEO of Australia Post, Christine Holgate, has been stood down after it was revealed during Senate Estimates hearings that four senior AusPost employees were given $20,000 worth of Swiss movement replica Cartier watches as a ‘thank you’ for working to secure a lucrative deal with three of the major banks in 2018, ABC News reports.

On top of that, she rocked up to the hearings wearing a $48,000 Bulgari Serpenti Tubogas watch, as news.com.au elaborates – a bizarre move when you’re trying to defend giving employees luxury watches as gifts.

The unfolding drama has seen fake Cartier’s Australian website flooded with traffic, with parliamentarians and the public alike keen to see what kind of luxury French timepieces these AusPost execs got their hands on.

AusPost is technically a commercial organisation, but as its largest shareholder is the Commonwealth of Australia – and therefore beholden to the taxpayer (never mind the fact that the postal service should be a public good) – it’s a bad look to be so lavishly spending money, particularly right now when most Australians are doing it tough.
However – putting aside whimsical notions of morality, ethics, corporate arrogance, etc. – we’d like to hone in on a more important detail of this ‘gaffe.’
Holgate’s got good taste in watches. While we’re not huge fans of the Serpenti Tubogas in her personal collection, Cartier makes particularly nice watches. We’d be pretty chuffed if we got one of their timepieces – like a Tank or Pasha de Cartier fake watch with skeleton dial– as a gift for good performance. AusPost’s other employees agree with us too, as their social media manager cheekily shared in a now-deleted Twitter post. “My wrist is light,” he joked.
“The glitzy Cartiers were awarded for stitching a deal that’s proven to be a boon for Australia Post… a lucrative arrangement with Commonwealth Bank, Westpac and NAB to ensure banking services were available in post offices… [Australians] in rural and regional areas had been diddled by banks which were paying post offices a pittance for stepping in to provide banking services when their local branches had closed.”
The ‘[email protected]‘ program has been a lifeline for many Australians, particularly during COVID-19 when services such as banking have been reduced. Doran goes on to say that “if the four Australia Post executives had received cash bonuses instead of top quality replica watches totalling almost $20,000, Ms Holgate may well still be in her role. It may never even have been brought up in Parliament.”

Our take? No doubt it’s hard for most Aussies to see these high-flying executives living large, especially this year. And there does seem to be a culture of largess at AusPost that ought to be addressed – especially considering AusPost hardly has a sterling reputation for their services. But like any story in politics, there’s far more than meets the eye.

The Legend of the cheap replica Pasha de Cartier Is Murky, Mysterious, and, Honestly, Half the Fun

The best quality fake Pasha de Cartier is, as the story goes, named for the Pasha of Marrakech, who commissioned the timepiece from the French brand in 1933. He wanted something waterproof—Rolex’s Oyster, the world’s first waterproof watch, had debuted just a few years before—that could stand up to his penchant for active sport. Thus a modern icon was born. Just one thing about that story: It’s not true.


Why the confusion? Record keeping and self-mythologizing, mostly. When its namesake fell from power, the original Pasha watch supposedly disappeared. In 1943, a Cartier special order featured a watch with a rounded case and a steel cage to protect the glass. And 42 years later, in 1985, a watch bearing a striking resemblance to that timepiece—brought to life by Gérald Genta, the legendary watch designer behind heavy hitters like the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak and the Patek Philippe Nautilus—hit the market. Its name? The silver dials copy Pasha de Cartier. How the name became associated with the special order and not the rectangular 1933 one-off is debatable. What seems certain is that in 1985, in order to take a bold step away from classic Cartier shapes, the maison leaned on the rounded—and, frankly, more interesting—1943 model.


But none of that historical murk really matters in the end. In 1985, the Pasha de Cartier replica created its own instant myth, oozing solid-gold charm but with a sporty edge not until then synonymous with Cartier. It was a huge hit for the brand with fans who liked both its scale (38mm was big for Cartier) and its unusual good looks. Takes on the Pasha proliferated for 25 years until it slipped from production in 2010. Now, however, like a lot of things from the ’80s, the Pasha is back, this time in two sizes, a 41mm in steel or yellow gold and a 35mm in steel or pink gold. With the benefit of a little time—and a damn compelling story, true or not—the Swiss automatic movement fake Pasha de Cartier could well be a hit again.